Quick Answer: Why Did Harold Thomas Sell The Aboriginal Flag?

Why is the Aboriginal flag on passports?

Well, that Aboriginal flag-looking symbol on the front of Aussie passports is not, in fact, an Aboriginal flag.

It’s actually the code to indicate the passport is an ePassport.

The colour of your passports can be influenced by political, geographical and even religious reasons..

How much did Harold Thomas sell the Aboriginal flag for?

Harold sold the licensing rights to WAM Clothing for a $20,000 lump sum plus royalties over 10 years.

Why did Harold Thomas design the Aboriginal flag?

Luritja artist Harold Thomas created the flag The red, black and yellow came to symbolise the strength, resistance and resilience of Aboriginal people, particularly for the modern land rights movement. … In 1995, it became an official flag of Australia by proclamation of the governor general, on 14 July.

What are the 3 flags of Australia?

Australia has three official flags: the Australian National Flag, the Australian Aboriginal Flag and the Torres Strait Islander Flag.

Are there any rules for flying the Aboriginal flag?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags are equal in status and can be flown on either side of the national flag. There is no rule stating that the Aboriginal flag must be to the right of the Australian National Flag and the Torres Strait Islander flag on the left of the Australian National Flag or vice versa.

When did Australian Aboriginal get the vote?

The Commonwealth Electoral Act 1962 received assent on 21 May 1962. It granted all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people the option to enrol and vote in federal elections.

How much of Australia is Aboriginal land?

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ rights and interests in land are formally recognised over around 40 per cent of Australia’s land mass.

Is Harold Thomas Aboriginal?

Harold Joseph Thomas (born c. 1947) is an Aboriginal Australian artist and activist descended from the Luritja people of Central Australia. … Thomas designed the flag in 1971 as a symbol of the Aboriginal land rights movement.

How did the Aboriginal flag get copyrighted?

Unlike most other flags around the world, the Aboriginal flag is still protected by copyright. That copyright is owned by Luritja man Harold Thomas, who created the flag for the National Aboriginal Day march in July 1971. … But in 1997, the Federal Court declared him the author and owner of the copyright.

Did Harold Thomas sell the Aboriginal flag?

Thomas awarded rights solely to Carroll & Richardson – Flagworld Pty Ltd and Birubi Art Pty Ltd for the manufacture and marketing of the flag and of products featuring the flag’s image. In June 2019, Birubi Art was fined A$2.3 million for selling products made in Indonesia as “Aboriginal art”.

Harold ThomasCopyright in the Aboriginal flag is owned by Aboriginal artist, Harold Thomas. The right to reproduce the flag on clothing worldwide is exclusively licensed to a non-indigenous company, WAM Clothing Pty Ltd (WAM Clothing).

Did the Aboriginal flag get sold?

Unlike most official flags, it is not owned by the government. Instead the flag belongs to Harold Thomas, an Aboriginal artist who designed it in 1971 for his people’s civil rights movement.

Why can’t the AFL use the Aboriginal flag?

The Australian Aboriginal flag will not be painted onto the centre circle of AFL grounds during this year’s Indigenous round due to a copyright issue with WAM Clothing. … That flag belongs to all Aboriginal people – not just to any individual.

How much did WAM pay for the Aboriginal flag?

WAM Clothing was established in Nov 2018 and signed a worldwide exclusive agreement with Harold Thomas for the use of the Aboriginal flag on Clothing. What we didn’t know was, Harold licensing agreement with WAM Clothing was for a $20,000 lump sum plus royalties over 10 years.

When did the last full blooded Australian Aboriginal die?

8 May 1876TruganiniTruganini (Trugernanner)Bornc. 1812 Bruny Island, Van Diemen’s LandDied8 May 1876 (aged 63–64) Hobart, Tasmania, AustraliaOther namesTruganini, Trucanini, Trucaninny, and Lallah Rookh “Trugernanner”Known forLast surviving full-blooded Aboriginal Tasmanian and terminal speaker of the Nuenonne language2 more rows